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Hey, Andrew! Teach Me Some Greek! Questions
When can my child start learning Greek?
Hey, Andrew! Teach Me Some Greek! - The Reader is geared for preschool children. The booklet contains pictures of four-year-old Andrew in various poses demonstrating the Greek letters. Catchy rhymes and giant Greek letters with directional arrows teach the alphabet in an appealing way. Once your child has pencil skills, he/she can begin the Level 1 Workbook, which teaches the alphabet, as does the Reader.
The Level 2 workbook teaches a core vocabulary which is used in Level 3 to introduce Greek grammar. The higher levels build from there.
When will a student be able to read the Bible in Greek?
When a student begins Hey, Andrew! Teach Me Some Greek! Level 3, we recommend that he/she start spending time each day in a Greek Interlinear New Testament, beginning with the gospel of John. Of course, at this point, the student will just be beginning to understand Greek words, forms, and sentence structure. As he/she progresses through the workbooks, understanding will continue to increase. As with most areas of knowledge, learning biblical Greek is a continuum. Even Bible scholars continue to sharpen their understanding.
Which form of the Greek language does this course teach?
Hey, Andrew! Teach Me Some Greek! teaches koiné (biblical) Greek.
Why doesn't Hey, Andrew! Teach Me Some Greek! teach the standard noun and verb paradigms and grammatical terms?
This series is intended for use with young children. We purposely refrain from introducing grammatical terms and paradigm memorization until the fourth level (although the paradigms are available in the appendix of Level 3). When the student reaches mid-elementary age, he/she is ready to incorporate grammatical terms, both English and Greek, into his/her understanding of the language. Among other aspects of Greek grammar, Level 4 focuses on the paradigms of Greek declensions and conjugations. Students are encouraged to apply these patterns of endings to their ever-expanding Greek vocabulary.
How many lessons and pages are in each of the Hey, Andrew! Teach Me Some Greek! workbook levels?
It is important to note that the workbooks are designed in such a way that the student simply progresses through each level on a page-by-page basis, rather than on a weekly lesson structure.
  • Level 1: 107 student pages; 28 lessons
  • Level 2: 143 student pages; 30 lessons
  • Level 3 through Level 8: 170 student pages; 36 lessons
  • Bible Copybook - The Gospel of John: 190 student pages
(The page counts for the student workbook levels above do not include the glossaries, paradigms, index, flashcard pages, etc. of the appendix.)
Does Hey, Andrew! Teach Me Some Greek! use an inductive or a deductive approach in presenting Greek grammar?
Greek grammar is introduced in Level 3 of Hey, Andrew! Teach Me Some Greek! This third level uses an inductive ("parts to whole") approach, which provides an easy introduction to Greek grammar for the young learner. Paradigms in the appendix of the third level are available for those who want to see the "whole" picture for the endings taught in the workbook. In addition, the teacher resource section at the beginning of the "Full Text" answer key provides "The Big Picture" charts with further explanation. Level 4 then transitions to a deductive ("whole to parts") approach.
How is the word "Koine" normally pronounced? Is the final "e" silent?
The Engish word koiné can be properly pronounced either koy-NAY or KOY-nay (where the capitalized letters indicate the stressed syllable). The Greek word κοινή is the feminine form of the adjective κοινός. It is pronounced koy-NAY.
When starting Level 1 do I use the Reader first and then alternate with the workbook? Do I go through the entire reader first?
We suggest that you begin reading through the Reader with your child. It should be an enjoyable activity as the child encounters the rhymes and learns to trace the giant Greek letters. As you suggested, once the child has pencil skills and is able to begin the Level 1 workbook, the Reader can again be used as each new letter is introduced. It is important to note that the Reader is not essential to the course. It is simply a picture book created to bring enjoyment to the process of learning the Greek alphabet.
From my understanding, all Greek words whether Koine or modern are spelled the same, but can be pronounced differently? Does that question make sense?
Modern Greek is not my area of expertise. However, perhaps I can address your question in this way. Let me begin by summarizing the development of the Greek language.
  1. Prior to 1500 B.C., the history of the Greek language is rather obscure.
  2. The "Formative Period" (from earliest Greek to the time of Homer - about 900 B.C) Tribes migrated from somewhere in west-central Asia to make their homes in the region now known as Greece. Because the terrain is quite rugged and irregular, these tribe existed mostly in isolation. Because of this, distinct dialects arose.
  3. The "Classical Period" (from Homer to the Alexandrian conquests - about 330 B.C.) In this period, the ancient Greek literature was written. One dialect gained prominence (the Attic dialect), from which evolved New Testament Greek.
  4. The "Koiné Period" (from the Alexandrian conquests to about A.D. 330) During this period, Greek was the "common" or prominent language of the people, spoken in their daily lives. Early in this period, colonization, the need for protection from eastern conquerors (especially the Persians), and a growing sense of religious unity among the Greek race led to the development of this "common" language.
  5. The "Byzantine Period" (from A.D. 330 to A.D. 1453) The Roman empire became divided. Hence, many factors influenced the language.
  6. The "Modern Period" (from A.D. 1453 to the present) Many feel that modern Greek is closer to New Testament Greek (Koiné Greek) than it is to the ancient Greek classical writings.
As one would expect in a language that evolved through the centuries (think of the evolution of our English language from the writings of Chaucer to today), differences now exist between the koiné and modern Greek in pronunciation, vocabulary, and even in grammar, but the differences are not extreme. Although I do not own one myself, I've read that the verses in a parallel Bible containing both the koiné and modern Greek look quite similar.
How do I order or find a Greek New Testament Interlinear Bible?
Most local Christian bookstores either carry or can order a Greek Interlinear New Testament. If you prefer to purchase over the internet, you will find several possibilities at major online booksellers, such as Christian Book Distributors or Amazon or Barnes and Noble. Simply search for "Greek Interlinear."
Where can I find the short Greek quizzes that help me determine the appropriate starting level for my student?
These short quizzes can be found as follows:
  1. On our Home page, click the link "Buy Online" beneath the image of the Greek Level 1 Workbook. (Don't worry....you won't add anything to the shopping cart.)
  2. You are now on the "Hey, Andrew! Teach Me Some Greek!" page. Click on the Level 1 Workbook image.
  3. You are now on the description page for the Greek Level 1 Workbook. On the right side of the page, you see the words, "Should I order this level?" Beneath these words, you will be given instructions and a short "quiz" to help you in your decision. After viewing the quiz, use the "BACK" arrow on your browser. Next, view the "answers" to see if your student should start with this level...or if you should proceed to the next quiz.
  4. To view the next quiz, again use the back arrow on your browser. When you have returned to the "Hey, Andrew! Teach Me Some Greek!" page, click on the Greek Level 2 Workbook. As before, there you will find the words, "Should I order this level?" on the right side of the page. Beneath these words, you will again see the link to the "quiz" as well as a link to the "answers."
  5. Continue this process until you have determined the best starting place for your student.
Alternately, simply click on the links below (and use the browser "Back" arrow to return to this page):
Latin's Not So Tough! Questions
Which pronunciation do you teach, classical or ecclesiastical?
Latin's Not So Tough! teaches classical pronunciation.
What does the first Latin workbook teach?
The student concentrates on the alphabet, diphthongs, and special consonant sounds in the first level. Besides pronunciation of Latin letters and combinations of letters, the workbook teaches the ordering of the alphabet, which is important for future dictionary work. Knowledge of the diphthongs, also taught in the first level, provides the foundation for future understanding of long and short syllables and accents.
Why would someone want to spend a whole year studying the Latin alphabet?
The first workbook level can be completed in less than one year. This is usually the case (unless the child is very young). In addition, we recommend that mid-elementary students who are just beginning their study of Latin start in the second level. Older students can easily start in the third level.
Why doesn't Latin's Not So Tough! teach the standard noun and verb paradigms and grammatical terms?
This series is intended for use with young children. In the pattern of our Hey, Andrew! Teach Me Some Greek! series, we purposely refrain from introducing grammatical terms and paradigm memorization until the fourth level (although the paradigms are available in the appendix of Level 3). When the student reaches mid-elementary age, he/she is ready to incorporate grammatical terms, both English and Latin, into his/her understanding of the language. Level 4 focuses on the paradigms of Latin declensions and conjugations. Students are encouraged to apply these patterns of endings to their ever-expanding Latin vocabulary.
How many lessons and pages are in each of the Latin's Not So Tough! workbook levels?
It is important to note that the workbooks are designed in such a way that the student simply progresses through each level on a page-by-page basis, rather than on a weekly lesson structure.
  • Level 1: 104 student pages; 28 lessons
  • Level 2: 144 student pages; 30 lessons
  • Level 3 through Level 6: 170 student pages; 36 lessons
(The page counts for the student workbook levels above do not include the glossaries, paradigms, index, flashcard pages, etc. of the appendix.)
Does Latin's Not So Tough! use an inductive or a deductive approach in presenting Latin grammar?
Latin grammar is introduced in Level 3 of Latin's Not So Tough! This third level uses an inductive ("parts to whole") approach, which provides an easy introduction to Latin grammar for the young learner. Paradigms in the appendix of the third level are available for those who want to see the "whole" picture for the endings taught in the workbook. In addition, the teacher resource section at the beginning of the "Full Text" answer key provides "The Big Picture" charts with further explanation. Level 4 then transitions to a deductive ("whole to parts") approach.
Where can I find the short Latin quizzes that help me determine the appropriate starting level for my student?
These short quizzes can be found as follows:
  1. On our Home page, click the link "Buy Online" beneath the image of the Latin Level 1 Workbook. (Don't worry....you won't add anything to the shopping cart.)
  2. You are now on the "Latin's Not So Tough!" page. Click on the Level 1 Workbook image.
  3. You are now on the description page for the Latin Level 1 Workbook. On the right side of the page, you see the words, "Should I order this level?" Beneath these words, you will be given instructions and a short "quiz" to help you in your decision. After viewing the quiz, use the "BACK" arrow on your browser. Next, view the "answers" to see if your student should start with this level...or if you should proceed to the next quiz.
  4. To view the next quiz, again use the back arrow on your browser. When you have returned to the "Latin's Not So Tough!" page, click on the Latin Level 2 Workbook. As before, there you will find the words, "Should I order this level?" on the right side of the page. Beneath these words, you will again see the link to the "quiz" as well as a link to the "answers."
  5. Continue this process until you have determined the best starting place for your student.
Alternately, simply click on the links below (and use the browser "Back" arrow to return to this page):
Gildersleeve and Bennett are listed as references for further study in the Latin's Not So Tough! "Full Text" Answer Keys. Which edition of each of these works matches the page numbers listed in LNST "Schedule of Lessons"?
Gildersleeve's Latin Grammar by B.L. Gildersleeve and G. Lodge (Reprint of the 1895, third edition, Macmillan & Co. Ltd.), Printed in U.S.A in 1997, Fourteenth Reprint, ISBN 0-86516-353-7
New Latin Grammar by Charles E. Bennett (Reprint of the 1908 Allyn and Bacon edition), Printed in the U.S.A. in 2000 by Untied Graphics, ISBN 0-86516-261-1
General Questions about Greek 'n' Stuff's Language Series
How are your Greek and Latin series different from other language series?
Our teaching methodology incorporates a gradual, yet consistent, exposure to Greek or Latin. Each year, after reviewing previous concepts and vocabulary, the student then expands his/her knowledge of the Greek or Latin language (in much the same way that English grammar is commonly learned).
Is there enough review in each level for older students or adults to begin at a level higher than Level 1?
Each level begins with a review of the material taught in the previous levels. If high school students or adults would like to start at a higher level, we suggest Level 3. Beginning with the third level, students enter into their study of the grammar of the language. If students have had no experience with inflections (the changing endings on verbs and nouns to indicate the roles of the words in sentences), we would suggest that they do not begin in a level above Level 3. For upper elementary and junior high students who want to begin at a higher level, we suggest Level 2, which thoroughly reviews the alphabet (the emphasis of Level 1) before introducing vocabulary.
What do parents who use your Greek and Latin in their homeschool say about it?
Parents tell us that these courses have laid a firm foundation for future advanced study.
What do children think about it?
Many families tell us that our Greek (or Latin) course is their child's favorite subject.
How important are the flashcards?
Extremely important. For this reason, each workbook contains "flashcard pages" in the appendix. (We also provide "already made" flashcards for those with time limitations.) Consistency with flashcard drill will ensure success in learning these languages.
What is the difference between the "Full Text" key and the "Answers Only" key?
The "Full Text" key is a duplication of the workbook with the answers filled in. It contains a proposal for scheduling the lessons as well as some English derivatives of the words taught in Level 2 and above. The "Answers Only" key is a smaller booklet listing the answers that belong on each page. Beginning with Level 3, the "Full Text" key gives The Big Picture - You Are Here grammatical overview charts, Teacher Tips, a few translation "Walk-Throughs," and references for further study.
How important are the quizzes and exams?
The Quizzes/Exams are optional. Some parents/teachers prefer to use them in their schooling situation. (The most essential aspect of this curriculum is consistent use of the flashcards. For those who would rather not make their own, our "Flashcards on a Ring" are available.)
Which should we teach first, Greek or Latin?
Many families are teaching their students both Greek and Latin simultaneously. Both languages provide excellent foundations for the study of our English language, as well as the study of additional languages such as French, Spanish, Italian, and others. Besides this, the study of a systematic language such as Greek or Latin encourages clear thought and sharpens thinking skills. If I had to choose one, I’d choose Greek. Other than the preparation Greek gives in the area of biblical study, this choice would simply be preference. Others may prefer Latin. My suggestion would be to choose the one your students are most interested in learning.
What method of payment do you accept?
From our U.S. and Canadian customers, we accept personal checks, U.S. money orders, Western Union Money Transfer® service, PayPal, and credit cards (via PayPal).
From our international overseas customers, we accept international money orders, Western Union Money Transfer® service, and PayPal.
How do I place an overseas international order?
Please visit our International Orders page.
What is your return policy?
Please visit our Return Policy page.
Are the workbooks reproducible or do I need to buy one for each child?
The workbooks are not reproducible. The purchase of a separate set of workbooks for each student is appropriate. We do occasionally have sale items. Please visit our irregular items page for more information.
How many credits would you assign for each book, or how many books would constitute a year of high school foreign language credit?
We would assign one semester each for Level 3 and Level 4 of our Greek series, and one year each for Level 5, Level 6, Level 7, and Level 8.
Latin Levels 3, 4, 5 and 6 are comparable with Greek Levels 3, 4, 5, and 6 in their extent of grammatical instruction. Although the standards for Latin vary widely, thus making it difficult to be absolutely definitive, it is acceptable to give up to three high school credits (three years) for this material (one-half credit each for Level 3 and Level 4, one credit each for Level 5 and Level 6). (Those with more rigorous expectations may give only one or two high school credits.)
If we are not of the Christian faith but would like to use your program to teach our daughters Greek and Latin how easy would it be for me to substitute words or passages from appropriate literature for them to practice with? My daughter is in first grade but very interested in learning Greek and she has a very good comprehension and reading level so I am sure this is the most interesting and best program for her! Thanks so much in advance for any help you can give!
As you know, Hey, Andrew! Teach Me Some Greek! teaches koiné (biblical Greek). Although the workbooks do not teach theology, the sentences students encounter as they progress through the series use words, phrases, sentences, and eventually entire chapters from the Greek New Testament. It would require a good deal of effort on your part to substitute words and passages from other literature.
Latin's Not So Tough! introduces biblical passages for translation in the fifth level. In this series, you could substitute passages from other literature with relative ease, since the biblical translations are found on only five pages interspersed throughout the workbook.
Do you have a list of good children's books written in Greek or Latin?
You will find an excellent list of children's books written in Latin at The American Classical League: Books in Latin.
I am unaware of good children's books written in koiné Greek.
What is the copyright policy on your Greek and Latin materials?
The consumable items in our language series include the student workbooks and the quizzes/exams booklets. All other items can be used with more than one student. It is appropriate to purchase a workbook and a quizzes/exams booklet (if you plan to administer our quizzes/exams) for each student.
Alone With God Bible Studies Questions
Could you please tell me the age or reading level that is the target audience for your Bible studies? They look interesting.
The Alone With God Bible studies were written primarily for the middle to upper elementary age group. However, some families use these workbooks during family devotions for younger students by reading the Scripture passages and questions orally. The series has also been used in Sunday School classes for the Junior High age group. Some adults, especially those for whom English is a second language, have enjoyed these workbooks as well.
Which Bible translations do you use?
Our Alone With God Bible study series has two translations available: King James Version (KJV) and New International Version (NIV).
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